About

We at Silvermine Apiary, home of Andrew’s Taste-Bud Bursting Local Wildflower Honey, can provide you with 100% pure, local, raw, kosher honey. Our family has been keeping bees since the 1800’s. We are a small family business, and most of our beehives are located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, Westchester County, New York, and Oyster Bay, Long Island.  We also have hives in New York City in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and finally Staten Island.  We provide top quality local honey, pollen, royal jelly, and other beehive products.

Silvermine Apiary (best known as Andrew’s Honey) has lots of bees in lots of places.  Most of our honey comes from Connecticut and New York.  We have mostly wildflower honey, but from time to time also have buckwheat, linden, blueberry, apple blossom, tulip poplar, alfalfa, and acacia (black locust) honeys.  Through this site, we will be selling honeys from other parts of the country and the world, sourced from trusted other beekeeping friends – honeys like tupelo, sourwood, cotton blossom, and leatherwood – and others as available.

The honey sold in retail stores, bottled and labeled as Andrew’s Taste-Bud Bursting Local Wildflower Honey is from Fairfield County, Connecticut, and Westchester County, New York.  These locations are less than one hour’s drive from any farmers’ market where we sell our honey, making the honey local by any reasonable standards, and full of local pollens and nectars that are considered to be the healthiest and most useful to the person fortunate enough to consume it.  But that is not the only honey that we produce.

For those of you in NYC who would like to have the absolute most local honey possible, look for our honey specially labeled by neighborhood. This is honey from our beehives located in community gardens, backyards, balconies and rooftops in New York City. These bottles are further labeled with their neighborhood of origin, for instance, Lower East Side, Greenpoint, Bay Ridge, Williamsburg, etc.

These honeys sell at a premium as there is limited nectar to go around in our metropolis, available rooftops are scarce.  Not to mention the traffic and the parking problems.  All of the honey from NYC is considered to be wildflower, but like all of our honeys, the taste, color, and nectar source changes from week to week, from nectar flow to nectar flow. In fact, the blooms change much more rapidly in NYC than elsewhere, resulting in honey from even neighboring hives that changes dramatically from harvest to harvest. Amongst other floral sources, there is a great deal of light, minty linden found in the taste from the spring honey, and a luscious and deep flavor from the fall Japanese knotweed nectar.